Commas after “i.e.” and “e.g.”

Many grammar books state that a comma is always required after "i.e." and "e.g." used in a sentence, as in "sentences often contain spelling errors, i.e., words spelled incorrectly". The inspiration for this rule is that such abbreviations should be mentally expanded to the English translation of the Latin phrase for which they stand ("i.e."…
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Serial commas

... In Britain and some other less-enlightened countries, the comma is often omitted before an 'and' in a list. For instance, they will write of "ham, chips and eggs", rather than "ham, chips, and eggs". I consider this an appalling,…

Punctuation after quotations

In American English (and in some cases for British English), punctuation following a bit of quoted text is traditionally placed  inside  the quotation. However, I consider that rule an egregious violation of the whole notion of quotation,…

Rules for Formal Academic Writing

Rules for formal writing are quite strict, though often unstated. Formal writing is used in academic and scientific settings whenever you want to convey your ideas to a wide audience, with many possible backgrounds and assumptions. Unlike…

Word-Level Issues in Academic Writing

Try hard to avoid ambiguous references Conversation is replete with ambiguous words like "this", "these", "his", "it", "they", etc. These words have no meaning in themselves, but in conversation the meaning is usually clear from the…